No. 129: Angling for a New Life

The Model T was a hit in Great Britain. The public snatched up the cars just as avidly as their cousins across the pond. But when the Model A debuted, in 1928, Brits didn’t get as excited. That led, ultimately, to Ford Motor Company’s decision to create a new line of cars for the BritishContinue reading “No. 129: Angling for a New Life”

No. 128: No Power, No Worries!

The Rover. Most people see that name and think of the nearly indestructible 4-wheel drive vehicles that have bounced over every continent on earth. But the badge also came attached to other vehicles. This is a Rover P5, most likely a ’68. The first appeared in 1958; the last, in 1973. It was a bulbousContinue reading “No. 128: No Power, No Worries!”

Agrarian Edition No. 7: Power No More

If you didn’t recognize the beat of its four-cylinder heart, didn’t know the bellow from its steel throat, surely you knew its badge: art, meeting agriculture. It was a Fordson. The name came from Henry Ford and Son, shortened to Fordson. The tractors prowled the planet — plowed it, too. From African plains to AlabamaContinue reading “Agrarian Edition No. 7: Power No More”

No. 126: Raggedy-Ass Ragtop

“Galaxie 500.” Never mind that Ford misspelled a word when this big machine debuted in 1959. The car was a rolling homage to a budding space race, when mankind turned its collective gaze to the cosmos. Ford’s engineers turned their eyes to the engine. The first Galaxie 500s featured 352-cubic-inch V-8s. They pounded out 300Continue reading “No. 126: Raggedy-Ass Ragtop”

No. 124: Along the Mother Road

Steinbeck called it ”the road of flight.” Desperate people, “refugees from dust and shrinking land,” found the highway and headed west. Folks still do. After negotiating a herd or burros, travelers may come across a 1952 3/4-ton Chevrolet pickup*, its metal dulled by the sun and the dust, by the relentless tramp of time alongContinue reading “No. 124: Along the Mother Road”

No. 123: The Surprise Around the Next Curve

A 1954 Chevrolet half-ton, a proud representative of the 3100 series of trucks,* thrusts an inquisitive nose into the fall air on a Georgia highway just beyond Atlanta’s outer ‘burbs. Harbins, 33 miles northeast of Atlanta. (Photo by Junkyard Correspondent Intern Sam Davis) *The Greatest Pickup Of All Time

No. 121: Holy Chrysler!

Hats off to those long-ago smart guys at Chrysler. In 1949, the company that rose from the ashes of the Maxwell Motor Co. came out with an innovation ahead of its time: padded dashboards. Better to hit your head on sponge rubber, they reasoned, than a steel dash or Bakelite knobs. Among those pad-dashed wondersContinue reading “No. 121: Holy Chrysler!”

No. 119: One More Model Before War

The new Ford was different than its predecessors. It had three-piece fenders — it would be easier, engineers figured, to replace a small part than an entire fender in the event of an accident — and came in three models: Standard, Deluxe and (new that year) Super Deluxe. Also debuting that year: two heaters! AsContinue reading “No. 119: One More Model Before War”