No. 131: Dust, Dirt, Decline

What is this? Hard to say. Time and use have removed any identifying badges that would indicate if this car rolled off an assembly line at Dearborn, Detroit, Auburn, Toledo or some other city that prided itself on auto production. It was built in the early 1930s; the slightly swept windshield post was a designContinue reading “No. 131: Dust, Dirt, Decline”

No. 130: Tapped Out, Mined Out, Abandoned

Senior Junkyard Correspondent Harold Colson — “Tex” to his intimates — recently took a blue highway* tour of parts of California and Nevada. As always, he brought along his camera. His patient wife, Deborah, said nothing – Tex didn’t mention anything in his dispatches, anyway – as her husband pulled off the road to photograph another wreck. AndContinue reading “No. 130: Tapped Out, Mined Out, Abandoned”

No. 129: Angling for a New Life

The Model T was a hit in Great Britain. The public snatched up the cars just as avidly as their cousins across the pond. But when the Model A debuted, in 1928, Brits didn’t get as excited. That led, ultimately, to Ford Motor Company’s decision to create a new line of cars for the BritishContinue reading “No. 129: Angling for a New Life”

No. 128: No Power, No Worries!

The Rover. Most people see that name and think of the nearly indestructible 4-wheel drive vehicles that have bounced over every continent on earth. But the badge also came attached to other vehicles. This is a Rover P5, most likely a ’68. The first appeared in 1958; the last, in 1973. It was a bulbousContinue reading “No. 128: No Power, No Worries!”

Agrarian Edition No. 10: Power No More

If you didn’t recognize the beat of its four-cylinder heart, didn’t know the bellow from its steel throat, surely you knew its badge: art, meeting agriculture. It was a Fordson. The name came from Henry Ford and Son, shortened to Fordson. The tractors prowled the planet — plowed it, too. From African plains to AlabamaContinue reading “Agrarian Edition No. 10: Power No More”

No. 126: Raggedy-Ass Ragtop

“Galaxie 500.” Never mind that Ford misspelled a word when this big machine debuted in 1959. The car was a rolling homage to a budding space race, when mankind turned its collective gaze to the cosmos. Ford’s engineers turned their eyes to the engine. The first Galaxie 500s featured 352-cubic-inch V-8s. They pounded out 300Continue reading “No. 126: Raggedy-Ass Ragtop”

No. 124: Along the Mother Road

Steinbeck called it ”the road of flight.” Desperate people, “refugees from dust and shrinking land,” found the highway and headed west. Folks still do. After negotiating a herd or burros, travelers may come across a 1952 3/4-ton Chevrolet pickup*, its metal dulled by the sun and the dust, by the relentless tramp of time alongContinue reading “No. 124: Along the Mother Road”

No. 123: The Surprise Around the Next Curve

A 1954 Chevrolet half-ton, a proud representative of the 3100 series of trucks,* thrusts an inquisitive nose into the fall air on a Georgia highway just beyond Atlanta’s outer ‘burbs. Harbins, 33 miles northeast of Atlanta. (Photo by Junkyard Correspondent Intern Sam Davis) *The Greatest Pickup Of All Time